The Truth Behind Kim Kardashian’s Botox Freak Out

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Few people in this world draw as much media attention as Kim Kardashian West. The reality star and businesswoman has been listed on Time’s list of most influential people multiple times. She and her half sisters Kylie and Kendall Jenner are among the most followed celebrities on Instagram and other social media platforms.

Everything Kardashian does makes headlines and gets mimicked. She’s responsible for launching endless fashion and beauty trends, which is why I was so perplexed that she freaked out over her Botox injections. It’s one of the safest and most common procedures she’s had over the years. For those who don’t remember Kim got Botox injections in the fifth season of Keeping Up with the Kardashians. Her eyes start to swell, she thinks she has a bad reaction and ends up swearing off Botox entirely. She’s since switched plastic surgeons, so it makes me wonder if perhaps her old doctor didn’t do a good enough job educating her on the temporary side effects.

It’s important to understand any cosmetic surgery procedures before getting them done, so you don’t end up being caught off guard like Kardashian was. Here’s what you need to know about Botox.

What Is Botox and Why Do People Use It?

Botox is a brand of injectable neuro-toxin made from botulinum toxin.  There are eight types of botulinum, named type A-H. While types E, F, and H are highly toxic, types A and B are widely used in medicine to treat muscle spasms, chronic migraines, excessive sweating, and limb spasticity, among other ailments. It’s also commonly used to reduce facial wrinkles by blocking certain chemical signals your nerves send to contract muscles.

Injecting Botox into the muscles underneath facial wrinkles causes them to relax. This visibly smooths wrinkles within three days, and in two weeks, you’ll see noticeably younger skin. The effect can last up to six months, and at that point, the wrinkles will slowly begin to reappear. At that point, it’s ok to get another injection.

Botox is approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for usage in wrinkles in the eyes (which is what Kardashian used it for) and upper face area. While it is generally safe, it does have some possible side effects. Like the skin-smoothing effect, these are typically temporary.

Side Effects and Common Reactions to Botox

When used improperly, Botox can inadvertently paralyze other unintended muscles. People who have misused the drug have experiences muscle weakness and trouble breathing. Of course, that’s a  worst-case scenario. You shouldn’t have these issues when Botox is injected by a qualified professional, and allergic reactions are rare.

However, you may likely experience redness, bruising, and pain at the injection site. Patients have also experienced slight dizziness, eye irritation, headache, and cold- or flu-like symptoms. These symptoms are typically mild, but if they intensify or persist beyond a day or two, talk to your doctor to treat them.

What Kardashian experienced was some mild eye bruising. It’s certainly a shock for someone who depends on her looks, but she was eventually informed that it’s a normal side effect. It faded away within a couple days, and she looked younger and more beautiful for months after.

Before you get any cosmetic procedure done, be sure to read up on the side effects. There’s no need to stress about your body’s normal reaction. Kim swore of Botox until she’s 40, which is only three years away. If you want to keep up with this Kardashian, stop by my office to find out if Botox is right for you.

 Related Articles:

KUWTK | Kim vs. Botox | E!
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4N0myCkoa4U&feature=youtu.be

Kim Kardashian vows ‘never again’ as she’s left with black eyes from Botox
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/tvshowbiz/article-1311633/Kim-Kardashian-attempts-turn-time-undergoes-Botox-injections.html

Exclusive: 24 Hours with Kim Kardashian
http://www.harpersbazaar.com/culture/features/a10567/kim-kardashian-0515/

Botulinum toxin injection for facial wrinkles.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25077722